Nigel is Professor of Food Safety and Veterinary Public Health at Massey University, New Zealand. He is Director of the Infectious Disease Research Centre (www.idrec.ac.nz) and the Executive Director of the the Molecular Epidemiology and Public Health laboratory in the Hopkirk Research Institute (http://mepilab.massey.ac.nz/), specializing in research and training in molecular epidemiology, food safety and the control of infectious diseases. Nigel has led a number of One Health inter-disciplinary research programmes, combining microbiology, molecular biology and modeling, in both New Zealand and the United Kingdom. He has published over 240 peer-reviewed journal articles, and 5 book chapters; many in the area of food safety and public health. Nigel is a Fellow of the Royal Society of New Zealand, a Fellow of Food Standards Australia New Zealand, a member of the New Zealand Food Safety and Assurance Advisory Council and the MPI/MoH Technical Advisory Group on Food Safety. He holds honorary/visiting professorships at the Universities of Liverpool and Surrey in the UK and the University of Otago Medical School in New Zealand. He was the recipient of the Massey University Research Medal in 2012.

Prior to joining Massey University in 2004, Nigel held a number of academic positions at the University of Bristol and, between 1996 and 2004, at the University of Liverpool, where he was Professor of Veterinary Epidemiology. Although his current focus is on molecular epidemiology of bacterial pathogens, he has also published extensively in the fields of equine welfare (colic and racing injuries), ruminant parasitology (ectoparasites and tick borne disease) and the health and productivity of smallholder dairy farming in East Africa. He graduated as a veterinary surgeon from the University of Bristol in 1987, and in 1993 he was awarded a PhD (Bristol) and a Masters degree in epidemiology (University of London, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine), funded by a Wellcome Trust Research Training Fellowship in Clinical Epidemiology.